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Top 15 Vet school interview questions and Answers

 

 

Receiving an offer for a vet school interview is an exciting day and another step toward becoming a wonderful veterinarian. Woohoo! While this is a terrific time to get excited, it’s also a great time to learn some useful interview skills. Preparation is essential for acing your vet school interview and demonstrating to the admissions committee why you deserve a spot. Please continue reading because I’d like to share the top 15 Vet School Interview Questions and Answers with you.

Top 15 Vet school interview questions and Answers

 

Do you have any previous veterinary medicine experience? 

If you’ve worked with veterinarians or veterinary researchers before, especially if you’ve had any hands-on experience with animals, that’s a great bonus. 

If you do have experience, you should describe it in detail, including what you did, where you did it, who your lead veterinarian was, and how this experience influenced your decision to pursue a career in veterinary medicine–ideally, it should reinforce your desire to attend vet school while also assisting you in understanding some of the more difficult aspects of the job (such as treating aggressive animals, being called to work at night, facing ethical dilemmas, etc). 

You should be able to explain why if you have no prior experience. Perhaps you decided to apply to veterinary school at the last minute, after seeing an event that changed your perspective or watching some films. And, as you’ve only lately made your decision, you’ve already worked at other places. However, you intend to obtain some experience during your studies because you understand how crucial it is. 

When summarizing your interview experience, try to speak with excitement. They should get the idea that you enjoy your work and that it serves a purpose. 

Do you have a backup plan? What are your plans if you are not accepted into veterinary school this year? 

The trick is to persuade them that your application and professional goals are serious. That means if you don’t get in this year, you’ll have to wait until the next application season to attempt again. However, you will not spend the entire year doing nothing but hanging out, drinking, and wiping your phone’s screen. You’ll strive to obtain as much practical experience with animals as possible, as well as improve your preparation for the next application cycle. 

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Different plans can also be suggested, as long as they make sense. You may, for example, volunteer on an ecological farm abroad while learning a new language and getting a firsthand look at how veterinary practice works in a foreign country and culture. 

Another option is to indicate that you believe you’ve done everything possible to succeed and that you will succeed. You do not consider failure an option, and once the application cycle is through, you will examine your next moves. Now is the time to concentrate all of your efforts and thoughts solely on the interviews. Why consider the possibility of a negative outcome in the first place? You’re confident that you’ll make it to vet school, and if you don’t, you’ll cross it when you get to it.

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When you’re not studying, how do you plan to spend your time in college? 

You have two choices for a decent response to this question. The first is that you want to devote practically all of your time to your academics. Your plan is to read books, books, and more books. You want to be one of the best students in the class, and you can’t picture doing much more than studying and helping at a clinic or farm until you have some hands-on experience. 

Of course, you won’t be an outcast who refuses to join your classmates for a round of beers (or glasses of orange juice). However, your education and possibly a part-time or volunteer position with a clinic are your top priorities, and everything else will be treated as secondary. 

Another possibility is to refer to campus community activities. Perhaps you want to work as a resident assistant, or join a student council to represent your peers, or volunteer at a library, or plan school events, or do something else to give back to the community. 

Selfless students who attempt to give back to their alma mater or other students are always highly valued by teachers and other admission committee members at the end of the day.

Tell me about your Weaknesses

This is a chance to promote yourself while also reflecting on your personality and attributes. Use examples to strengthen your thesis and to demonstrate your best qualities while describing your abilities. When discussing your flaws, highlight what you believe is most essential, but don’t be too self-deprecating, and outline how you want to improve in these areas. 

Do you see yourself as a leader or as a follower? 

Many applicants choose one of the options above before explaining why. Instead, attempt to illustrate how, depending on the scenario, you can be both of those things. On a daily basis, vets frequently find themselves in the role of both leader and follower. Vets will behave as leaders in some situations (e.g., chief vet) and followers in others, depending on the situation (when following clinical instructions, as a junior vet etc). It’s critical to demonstrate that you can do both. Briefly describe what you mean when you say you’re a leader and a follower. To reinforce your answer even further, try to include some examples to demonstrate whether you are a leader or a follower. The interviewer wants to see that you have a diverse set of experiences, and remember that this is an opportunity for you to demonstrate your involvement in a variety of activities. This can serve as a warm-up for follow-up inquiries. Choose one of the two options and reiterate the major reasons why you think that one is better for you.

Can you tell us about a recent development or advancement in veterinary medicine that has piqued your interest? 

This question is actually a benefit in disguise since it allows you to steer the conversation toward a topic that you are familiar with and are passionate about. If you have nothing to say, however, this query is not just pointless, but also harmful. As a result, you should do some more research before your interview and be prepared for a question like this. Choose any topic you like, but make sure you have a thorough understanding of it so you can respond to any follow-up questions the interviewers may have. 

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This is by no means an exhaustive list, but it should give you a fair sense of the types of questions you’ll be asked during your vet school interview. We don’t recommend writing and memorizing responses to anticipated interview questions, but planning out the framework of your answer and the points you want to convey is a smart idea. We also recommend that you prepare some questions to ask during a veterinary school interview, as you will be given the opportunity to ask questions at the end of each interview. 

Why do you want to be a veterinarian? 

This is a question you must prepare for because it is asked at practically every vet school interview in some form. It’s also one of the most difficult topics to answer, so make it personal by talking about your own experiences. Clichés like “I enjoy animals and science” are unfortunately overused and will not get you very far. If you want to stand out from the crowd, come up with a unique response that demonstrates to the interviewer that you have a thorough understanding of the veterinary profession and what it includes.

Can you tell us about a recent development or advancement in veterinary medicine that has piqued your interest? 

This question is actually a benefit in disguise since it allows you to steer the conversation toward a topic that you are familiar with and are passionate about. If you have nothing to say, however, this query is not just pointless, but also harmful. As a result, you should do some more research before your interview and be prepared for a question like this. Choose any topic you like, but make sure you have a thorough understanding of it so you can respond to any follow-up questions the interviewers may have. 

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This is by no means an exhaustive list, but it should give you a fair sense of the types of questions you’ll be asked during your vet school interview. We don’t recommend writing and memorizing responses to anticipated interview questions, but planning out the framework of your answer and the points you want to convey is a smart idea. We also recommend that you prepare some questions to ask during a veterinary school interview, as you will be given the opportunity to ask questions at the end of each interview. 

Why do you want to be a veterinarian? 

This is a question you must prepare for because it is asked at practically every vet school interview in some form. It’s also one of the most difficult topics to answer, so make it personal by talking about your own experiences. Clichés like “I enjoy animals and science” are unfortunately overused and will not go you very far. If you want to stand out from the crowd, come up with a unique response that demonstrates to the interviewer that you have a thorough understanding of the veterinary profession and what it includes.

 

How to Prepare for a Vet Interview 

Smile

Although it may seem self-evident, smiling checks a box that the interviewers are searching for. Academic knowledge and right answers are important, but to become a skilled veterinarian, you’ll need much more. The interviewers want to evaluate how you handle pressure situations. Interviews may be difficult for everyone, so use this as an opportunity to demonstrate your abilities. Smiling shows the examiner that you are enthusiastic about what you are discussing, but what else? It demonstrates that you are unconcerned about the pressure (even if you are afraid!) and are determined to enjoy the interview. These are excellent qualities in a future veterinarian! 

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Expect the unexpected! 

If you’re applying to veterinary school, the university will be curious as to why you’re interested. They want to know why you want to be a veterinarian and why you want to attend that particular university. Linking this to your previous experience and any additional research you’ve done can help you stand out from the crowd. 

Keep up with the latest veterinary news. 

There will always be a plethora of hot topics in veterinary medicine. These include everything from a lack of veterinarians to the breeding of brachycephalic canines. The interviewers will notice how interested you are if you are aware of some of these issues and feel comfortable discussing them. It’ll be a hit with them! And who knows, maybe you’ll learn something new as well. For this, The Vet Record is a fantastic online resource. 

Consider the question carefully. 

Each question you are asked is intended to assist the institution learn more about you. If you can figure out what the university wants to know, you’ll be able to check the box and demonstrate that you’re a good fit for their vet school. Make them want you more than anything! 

In the group task, be your best self. 

The objective of a group project is to see how effectively you collaborate with others, so show them! This type of station puts your ability to communicate with other applicants to the test. Starting by introducing yourself to the group and asking everyone else to do the same is a terrific strategy to impress the interviewers. Using everyone’s names shows that you’re paying attention and that you want to work together to find a solution. 

Consider your previous experiences. 

Work experience is an important aspect of getting into veterinary school, and interviewers will ask you about it. If you can learn a case via practice, that’s fantastic! You may take it a step further by reflecting on what you’ve seen and talking about what went well and what didn’t. This demonstrates that you’ve thought about your experiences and how you wish to improve—a crucial characteristic. 

Dress for the occasion. 

It’s not a fashion show in the interview! There’s no reason to buy a new ball gown! You want to present yourself properly, but it’s also fine to show off your personal style! Avoid sweatshirts and sneakers in favor of anything more on the smart-casual to smart side of the spectrum. Follow the advice given by each university when it comes to what to wear. 

Practice 

This is something you can’t do enough of. The majority of folks are concerned about coming up blank and not knowing what to say. This is entirely understandable, and one approach to calm yourself is to practice answering some sample questions. You should find yourself relaxing and opening up as you get into the groove of things.

 

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